What’s in a name?

Itinerant From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia An itinerant is a person who travels from place to place with no fixed home.[1] The term comes from late 16th century: from late Latin itinerant (travelling), from the verb itinerari, from Latin iter, itiner (journey, road).[2] Types of itinerants * Drifters (rogues, rovers, vagabonds, vagrants) * Perpetual travelers, including illegal aliens (migrants) * Nomads, including hunter-gatherers and gypsies * Hobos, including tramps, bums, derelicts * Refugees and displaced persons * Street people (street children, paupers, squatters, waifs, schnorrers) * World citizens Itinerants throughout history and today * Freight Train Riders of America (freighthoppers in United States) * Romani people * Various indigenous peoples (indigenous peoples, including uncontacted peoples) * Afar people in Horn of Africa * Bajau of Philippines * Banjara of India * Bedouin (nomadic Arab people of the desert) * Beja people in North Africa * Bushmen of Southern Africa * Dom people in North Africa and Southwest Asia * Eurasian nomads of Eurasian Steppe * Ghilzai in South-Central Asia * Indigenous Australians * Indigenous Norwegian Travellers * Indigenous peoples of the Americas * Irish Travellers * Kuchi people of Afghanistan * Nomads of India * Pygmy peoples in Equatorial Africa and parts of Southeast Asia * Quinqui in northeren half of Spain) * Scottish Travellers * Yeniche people in Europe * Carnies (travelling show-people) * Hippies, including New Age travellers and Rainbow Travellers * Jossers (circus artists) * Kobzari (musicians of Ukraine) * Lightermen (bargees in England) * Peredvizhniki (realist artists of Russia) * Swagmen (homelessness transients in Australia and New Zealand) * Circuit riders and Gyrovagues (Christian ministers and monks) * Bhikkhus (Buddhist monks) * Mendicants (beggars of Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, Jainism and Buddhism) * Pilgrims (religious travellers) * Sadhus (Jain monks) *Global Circumnavigaters * Christopher McCandless * Friedrich[…]

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My First Post

On the new and wonderful site! Doesn’t look different to you? Well, that’s cause it’s not, much.  I’ve been itching to update our version of WordPress, but our host didn’t have a sufficiently up-to-date version of mysql.  I finally bit the bullet and we’ll now be paying for this site in order to send our thoughts and images into the…I wanted to say aether and then hesitated, but I’m on a cell-modem…I guess aether works! If you see anything that doesn’t seem to work, please let me know asap.  However, I haven’t resolved a small issue with the new email hosting…sigh…so notify me at my old domain.  The address is my name at svsapien dot net. Please be sure to resubscribe to our RSS feed (just above the clock).  The old feed won’t get any updates from here on out. Thank you and goodnight.

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Smog – Lyrics for Drunk on the Stars

I wasn’t made for this You tell yourself As you button up your coat Head down to the harbor And standing on the dock You’re drunk on the stars and the sea air Tell yourself maybe I should throw it all away And be a sailor Cause after all Your true home is the sea So you walk down to the water And a big wave crashes on your feet I don’t like this you say So you turn around and head back home To some apartment On some main street of a pointless town That you’re trying to put on the map And you sit right down and write a big fat check To the gas company You drape your wet socks over the radiator And you laugh at all the sailors And you laugh at all the sailors Freezing on the sea

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For the Love of Spanish Cedar

One of the best things about a boat our size is this: everything we do is a dramatic improvement.  We’ve worked pretty hard on this lovely creature, and she keeps paying us back by looking and functioning and feeling better and better and better. If I’m glowing a bit, it’s because we just did a single day’s work that brought together months of effort.  Long time back, we tore out every speck of cabinetry, paneling, etc, down to bare hull.  We’ve been building that side back up slowly.  First, we built the battery box.  Second, we build the settee. Third was to be the settee cabinet, but a winter intervened and I’m very glad it did.  We discovered that our old solid-construction fiberglass hull sweated like mad.  For the non-mariners in the group, that means that cold weather outside, contrasted with warm air inside, causes condensation to form on the inside of the hull.  It forms; it runs down; it makes everything that touches the hull sopping wet. We quickly developed a plan to create a little open-air insulation.  Modern boats have a core sandwiched into the fiberglass hull that insulates; older boats need actual foam or at least some space for air to circulate and cool.  We decided that we’d make her look her age…ahem…I mean, traditional…by applying horizontal battens a half-inch from the hull, with a half-inch between, in order to encourage a dry hull.  The salty term for this is ceiling planking, where the ceiling on a boat is the “wall” created by the hull.  It reduces the sweating and, when condensation does happen, these battens will keep all our various fabrics away from the water. We purchased 200′ of Spanish Cedar from Chesapeake Light Craft in Annapolis, MD.   John Harris was tremendously helpful, by reading[…]

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