Another crime of capitalism…

I (James)  finished the engine just outside the Norwalk entrance channel on a heading of 100 East for Port Jefferson, Long Island, NY with two reefs in the main and the jib paid out all the way to 130%. It was one of those sailing experiences that you never read about, meaning, uneventful. The wind was perfect, the seas were with us and we only saw a handful of boats for the entire adventure. It was a prime example of why we live this way. On the VHF radio we heard about a research vessel that had lost its Diver Propulsion Vessel, which was jetting itself all over the Norwalk channel, but that was behind us. There was a NOAA survey vessel, R/V Thomas Jefferson, doing maneuvers and making depth-soundings all the way across the Sound but again no concern of ours, just a minor course adjustment is all. The most excitement we had was shaking the reefs out when the wind softened and pulling them back in when it stiffened.  Both events were handled, one each, by the one of us on watch, single-handed, without trouble. Coming through the narrow cut between Mount Misery Point and the Old Field Beach, we slid through the water as though oiled.  The fresh bottom paint does have an effect.  The wind was southern but scheduled to turn west overnight, so we skipped anchoring in the Sand Pit from which a century of Manhattan concrete was taken.  Instead, we turned starboard just before the red nun 4 in order to run up the small channel between Strong’s Neck and the beach. Even before making the turn, we could see that our Snug Harbor, our Sheltered Cove was speckled with mooring buoys. A little background on the humble mooring buoy. A mooring buoy is[…]

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