Chasing Lighthouses

It’s always been one of the problems with our travels, we don’t like to go back! Going back doesn’t have to mean going backwards but sometimes it’s hard to get that out of our heads, unless of course we don’t go back to the same old places and let’s face it, in a place like Maine you don’t ever have to go back to the same old places. After our lovely anchorage off Dix Island we pulled the hook and headed out on glass with the main up and started chasing light houses. Maine has some of the strangest lights on the east coast and the odd thing about most of them are, quite a few have been discontinued and sold off as exotic vacation homes and roofs which you can view from this hyperlink- Palm Beach Roofing Expert. Some people fix them up and some don’t. We did ultimately catch some good wind after stopping in Port Clyde for fuel and very nicely made our way all the way into Christmas Cove where we tucked in for an awesome pasta made on the boat by me (James) and a good night’s sleep. Christmas Cove is a pretty little hot spot on Rutherford Island in the town of South Bristol. We didn’t even make landfall. But Dena got lots of great pictures before taking the helm as we motored away on another glassy early morning underway. We had some business to take care of in Robinhood Cove, where they have a courtesy car for marina customers, so we were obliged to rent one of their moorings for the night. It was nice to get some showers in and fill the boat with provisions before heading on up the Sasanoa River to Bath. The river has two “Hell Gates”: a lower[…]

Read more

A day at Haut

Throwing off the mooring pennant in Stonington was easy. That’s the most dangerous thing about shagging on a moron-ball, they’re too easy! You sneak in, pick up the pennant, look around to make sure nobody’s coming your way, you finish the engine and get drunk. …But what you don’t get is the knowledge that what is holding you to the Earth is ground tackle that you put together and you know will hold you in almost any weather conditions. If you shag a ball you never know what’s under you and that always gives me (James) an edginess that ultimately keeps me awake at night and makes me want to get back on the hook in some thick-ass mud or some sand. Stonington was nice but the whole time we were there I kept looking out at the harbor to make sure the boat was still there and there was nobody fucking with it. Also the whole goddamn town wakes up at 0400, gets in their lobster boats and takes off at maximum wake to go rape the local waters of ALL the lobsters! Stonington claims to have the largest lobster haul in the world, bringing in over $57 million a year of those bottom feeding sea-bugs. We love to anchor! There is nothing quite like sleeping in a sheltered cove or a snug harbor at anchor cuddled up to the person of your dreams… Believe me, we know, we do it all the time! For example, Isle au Haut. We sailed, nice and slow, down through the rubble islands of Merchant Row, where granite was wrestled out of the ground and taken to the Kennedy Memorial, the Museum of Natural History, and many more iconic buildings. Wrapping up that short trip, we anchored in tiny Duck Harbor in the[…]

Read more

180 degrees of wake up

The summer comes to a clapping close when the winds turn from the southwest to the northeast. Just like that, we’re heading south again. Right after we picked up Dena’s new books from the local post office (sent to her general delivery) we left Winter Harbor astern riding a light nor’easter. By sunset we were back on Swans Island, only this time we shagged a mooring on the northeast side at Minturn in Burnt Coat Harbor. A gentle windless night awoke to a choppy nor’easterly fog in the morning so we tucked in a couple of reefs and headed out early to weave our way through the rocky islands of Toothacher and Jericho Bays. Unlike the photo above we never once saw the sun during our brisk sail over to Stonington from Minturn. We rocked and rolled into Stonington Harbor in the Deer Isle Thorofare (yes, it’s really spelled like that) before noon on a freshening broad reach and a racing flood, picked up another free mooring, and whipped up some burritos. The town is nicely vertical and easy on the eyes. After lunch we rowed into town for some groceries and some light Hollywood entertainment then it was back to the boat where the sleep was constantly interrupted throughout the night by the local lobster fishers coming and going. Stonington claims the biggest haul of lobster in the world with an annual income of over $57 million just in lobster alone! With the cooler winds coming down from Greenland we are stacking on the layers as we make our way back to warmer climates. But it promises to be a long adventure before we can catch some of those balmy trades that are calling us south. The nor’easters are still short and unpredictable, so we’re bouncing along the coast[…]

Read more

Lost and Found in the Milky Way

After almost a month in-and-out of our anchorage in Somes Harbor, we set sail for the depths of our Down East adventures. We headed southeast out of the fjord to the Island of Little Cranberry, shagged a mooring, and went in for a totally decadent seafood extravaganza at the only restaurant on the island, Islesford Dock. The food was extraordinary but the late summer crowd was the cause for the worst service either one of us could remember getting in our adult lives… Really, it was that bad! But, even that dumb-ass bartender/waiter that did everything in his power to let everyone within ear-shot know how ridiculously disgruntled he was for having to actually serve people couldn’t even spoil our event. It was a double celebration: kicking loose of a long stay and the completion of the first draft of Lysistrata Cove. We were underway again and we were unstoppable! The next morning we sailed off the mooring and into Northeast Harbor for some last minute provisioning and practically bounced off that dock and back out to open water. We took advantage of the (light but steady) NE breeze by broad reaching for most of the day through the islands and lobster fields of our downeast home. In the late afternoon as we rounded up on Swan’s Island we got a rare treat, a visit from a rather large local pod of dolphin. Large pod, not large dolphin – these are wee timorous beasties. They couldn’t spare the time to ride our bow but they were close enough to see that they were busy gorging on a big school of mackerel. Speaking of Mackerel… Mackerel Cove is a snug little anchorage inside the western point of Swan’s Island so we tacked on a beat all the way up to the[…]

Read more

Just another day at the office

Remember this?! Over the last three weeks we’ve been working our little tails off (between rain storms and Dena beginning and completing the first draft of her third novel) repairing our port-side toe rail where the genoa track (plum) tore its fasteners right out of that teak. At first we entertained (maybe the wrong choice of words there) the thought of cutting out the bad section completely and replacing it with a scarfed in section of some Ash-wood that we’ve had lying around for quite some time. We’ve both always heard that, because of the different expansion and contraction rates of different woods, it’s never a good idea to do any kind of scarfing with anything but the original kind of wood… That has always made sense to us. Well, we didn’t have a piece of teak big enough to do the scarf and we didn’t want to just fuck-in a bunch of epoxy so we opted for the next best thing… Fiberglass to the rescue! First we had to deconstruct a big enough section of the toe-rail to make a fiberglass repair worth the time so we went over to Northeast Harbor, ME. Got a slip for a day and a night and… …Broke out the heat gun, the scraper box, and the power-sander and melted our (practically) newly painted toe-rail right down to the bare wood. It was awesome! We were on the Hinkley sales dock right next to a million dollar plastic destroyer and we kept getting the shitty eyeball from the salesman that was hanging out in the air conditioned pilothouse of a boat that was definitely not his. Look over Dena’s left shoulder in the shot above… That over priced Clorox-bottle was baby-shit green, ugh! The next day we moved the boat back up Somes[…]

Read more